INDEPENDENT REVIEWING OFFICER UK


INDEPENDENT REVIEWING OFFICER UK

via INDEPENDENT REVIEWING OFFICER UK.

The appointment of an independent reviewing officer (IRO) is a legal requirement under Section 118 of the Adoption and Children Act 2002.

IROs make an important contribution to the goal of significantly improving outcomes for looked after children. Their primary focus is to quality assure the care planning process for each child, and to ensure that his/her current wishes and feelings are given full consideration.

Is this really true?

in·de·pend·ent

[in-di-pen-duhnt] Show IPA

adjective
1.  not influenced or controlled by others in matters of opinion, conduct, etc.; thinking or acting for oneself: an independent thinker.
2.  not subject to another’s authority or jurisdiction; autonomous; free: an independent businessman.
3.  not influenced by the thought or action of others: independent research.
4.  not dependent; not depending or contingent upon something else for existence, operation, etc.
5.  not relying on another or others for aid or support.
 
 
Well, well well!  If you are not a charity, share the same building and stationary as the Council and you are also on the payroll of the Council how is this independent?
 
Will someone please explain how the  INDEPENDENT REVIEWING OFFICER UK is truly INDEPENDENT!  A good judge would ask the very same question.
 

About towardchange

Your ‘Family Rights’ believing in the best interest of children. The issues which are important to me are, children and their families, the injustices to parents, which may occur, because of inadequate information, mistakes or corruption. This is happening every day. every minute and every second.
This entry was posted in Care Proceedings, Foster Care, IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE, Local Authorities, Northamptonshire, President of the Family Division, Public Law, Secret family courts and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to INDEPENDENT REVIEWING OFFICER UK

  1. Pingback: INDEPENDENT REVIEWING OFFICER UK | Public Law Children Act Cases | Scoop.it

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.