Challenging Miscarriages Of Justice


Challenging Miscarriages Of Justice

Source: Guildford Four and Maguire Seven – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

“Challenging Miscarriages – the Inability of the System to Accept Responsibility”

by Mark Newby, United Against Injustice, Conference, Liverpool, Saturday 10th October 2015.

My argument here today is that we are probably at the worst moment we have ever been at for tackling such miscarriages and I would say that one of the fundamental reasons for this is the inability of the machinery of the state to accept responsibility and admit error when they are wrong.

You see we are all human beings in the end and a system that relies on individuals will in the end deliver outcomes based upon human error. Whether you are the hapless accused, the Police, the Prosecutor, the Defence Counsel, the Jury, the Judge, the appeal lawyer, the CCRC or the Appeal Judges We All Make Mistakes And We Are All Infallable .

Of course the fundamental problem with a system that never admits mistakes is that it is in a downward spiral – organisations that cannot admit fault in the end will become failing organisations. The easiest answer is to brush it under the carpet or find an excuse for why things went wrong.  Continue Reading 

Mark Newby

 

I believe that keeping silent when an injustice is taking place is condoning it.

Report of Georgia Senator Nancy Schaefer on CPS Corruption.

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The 30 Articles of Human Rights – YouTube.Race

Do your own research

Ngozi Godwell aka @NgoziGodwell (towardchange) on @Pinterest.

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About towardchange

Your ‘Family Rights’ believing in the best interest of children. The issues which are important to me are, children and their families, the injustices to parents, which may occur, because of inadequate information, mistakes or corruption. This is happening every day. every minute and every second. For years I have campaigned for the rights of children and their voices to be heard.
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