Criminal Law Act 1967 c.58


 

Criminal Law Act 1967 c.58

Common law, section 3 of the Criminal Law Act 1967 states that

Self-Defence Of Property In English law The defence of property is a common method of justification used by defendants who argue that they should not be held liable for any loss and i…

Source: Self-Defence Of Property In English law.

An Act to amend the law of England and Wales by abolishing the division of crimes into felonies and misdemeanours and to amend and simplify the law in respect of matters arising from or related to that division or the abolition of it; to do away (within or without England and Wales) with certain obsolete crimes together with the torts of maintenance and champerty; and for purposes connected therewith.

[21st July 1967]

 

Arrest without warrant. 2. — (1) The powers of summary arrest conferred by the following subsections shall apply to offences for which the sentence is fixed by law or for which a person (not previously convicted) may under or by virtue of any enactment be sentenced to imprisonment for a term of five years (or might be so sentenced but for the restrictions imposed by section 33 of the Magistrates’ Courts Act 1980)] and to attempts to commit any such offence; and in this Act, including any amendment made by this Act in any other enactment, “arrestable offence” means any such offence or attempt.
[The said restrictions are those which apply where, in pursuance of subsection (2) of section 22 of the said Act of 1980](certain offences to be tried summarily if value involved is small) a magistrates’ court summarily convicts a person of a scheduled offence within the meaning of [the said section 22].
(2) Any person may arrest without warrant anyone who is, or whom he, with reasonable cause, suspects to be, in the act of committing an arrestable offence.
(3) Where an arrestable offence has been committed, any person may arrest without warrant anyone who is, or whom he, with reasonable cause, suspects to be, guilty of the offence.
(4) Where a constable, with reasonable cause, suspects that an arrestable offence has been committed, he may arrest without warrant anyone whom he, with reasonable cause, suspects to be guilty of the offence.
(5) A constable may arrest without warrant any person who is, or whom he, with reasonable cause, suspects to be, about to commit an arrestable offence

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Your ‘Family Rights’ believing in the best interest of children. The issues which are important to me are, children and their families, the injustices to parents, which may occur, because of inadequate information, mistakes or corruption. This is happening every day. every minute and every second. For years I have campaigned for the rights of children and their voices to be heard.
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