Common Law


Common Law

Most judges and attorneys of the lower courts have little, if any, knowledge of the Common Law.

Source: The History Of The English Common Law Has Been The History Of Remedies – Part 1

n.

1. Law established by court decisions rather than by statutes enacted by legislatures.
2. The law of England adopted by its territories and colonies, including the United States at the time of its formation.
Noun 1. common law – (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisions

service – (law) the acts performed by an English feudal tenant for the benefit of his lord which formed the consideration for the property granted to him
civil law – the body of laws established by a state or nation for its own regulation
2. common law – a system of jurisprudence based on judicial precedents rather than statutory laws; “common law originated in the unwritten laws of England and was later applied in the United States”

Barrister

Barristers are distinguished from solicitors, who have more direct access to clients, and may do transactional-type legal work. It is mainly barristers who are appointed as judges, and they are rarely hired by clients directly.

In a few jurisdictions, barristers are usually forbidden from “conducting” litigation, and can only act on the instructions of a senior solicitor, who performs tasks such as corresponding with parties and the court, and drafting court documents. In England and Wales, barristers may seek authorisation from the Bar Standards Board to conduct litigation. This allows a barrister to practise in a ‘dual capacity’, fulfilling the role of both barrister and solicitor.

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Your ‘Family Rights’ believing in the best interest of children. The issues which are important to me are, children and their families, the injustices to parents, which may occur, because of inadequate information, mistakes or corruption. This is happening every day. every minute and every second. For years I have campaigned for the rights of children and their voices to be heard.
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